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GOP: Is changing the message, but not the policy enough?

AP headline: “Jindal: GOP should change 'just about everything.'”

Still, Jindal’s not advocating changing policy or the party moderating its views. “We do not need to change what we believe as conservatives — our principles are timeless,” he said.

So he’s NOT thinking about running then? "Any Republican that's thinking about talking about running for president is 2016 needs to get his head examined," Jindal said, per NBC’s Carrie Dann. "We've got a lot of work to do. We've got to get the Republican Party back on track."

More from Dann: For RNC members assembling in Charlotte for their post-mortem meeting on the election, the mood feels kind of like the punchiness of a long-pummeled team coming back to training camp after a particularly bruising season. Members are candid about the reasons for the tough loss -- including everything from the party's "tone" in addressing minority voters to being trounced in the technology arms race. But for now, there's not much talk about specific policy prescriptions; the group's election review panel is more focused on candidate recruitment, message strategy and making sure the primary process doesn't clobber their eventual nominee. But it's worth noting that their full recommendations won't be out until March of this year.

Beth Reinhard notes that for all the attention Jindal’s speech got in DC, the audience didn’t seem that into it: “Jindal's delivery resembled that of a nervous student rushing through an oral recitation of a term paper. The audience was as distracted as a room of high school classmates. Which raises the question: Can a fast-talking, brainy policy wonk be elected president?”

Rand Paul is not Ron Paul. Could you ever see Ron saying this: “Well absolutely we stand with Israel, but what I think we should do is announce to the world – and I think it is pretty well known — that any attack on Israel will be treated as an attack on the United States.”