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More 2012: It's Dewhurst vs. Cruz

Ex-Rep. Artur Davis is now officially a Republican.

FLORIDA: “A new Florida Opinion Research poll finds former Gov. Charlie Crist (I) would trounce Rick Scott (R) in Florida's 2014 gubernatorial race if Crist ran this time as a Democrat, 48% to 34%,” Political Wire writes.

ILLINOIS: “Brad Harriman, the Democratic nominee to replace retiring Rep. Jerry Costello (D-Ill.), has dropped out of the race, creating a major void and giving Republicans a better chance of winning the seat,” The Hill reports. “Harriman, who was Costello's hand-picked candidate and highly touted by national Democrats, cited a neurological disorder as his reason for quitting the campaign.”

NEVADA: Shelly Berkeley’s up with a new bio ad.

NORTH CAROLINA: The Democratic mess in the Tarheel state continues… “Adriadn Ortega, the young man who claimed that former state Democratic Party Executive Director Jay Parmley sexually harassed him, is threatening to sue the party and Chairman David Parker for defamation and breach of contract,” WRAL reports.”In a letter sent to Parker Tuesday, Ortega's lawyer, Kieran Shanahan, demands that the party save all documents that might be related to the episode.”

TEXAS: “Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and former state Solicitor General Ted Cruz are headed to a July 31 runoff to determine the Republican nominee for Senate, igniting a showdown between the Washington, D.C., tea party community and the Texas GOP establishment,” Roll Call writes, adding, “Cruz advancing to the runoff is a welcome development for Beltway-based conservatives who have been playing in GOP primaries with the hopes of recreating some of the tea party movement’s 2010 magic — especially after falling way short with their preferred candidate in the Nebraska Senate GOP primary earlier this month.”

“In a major upset, longtime U.S. Rep. Silvestre Reyes has lost the race for the Democratic nomination to retain his congressional seat in far West Texas,” AP writes. Reyes lost narrowly to former El Paso city councilman Beto O'Rourke. Reyes appeared to be closing the gap as more votes were tallied, but O'Rourke finished with just more than 50 percent of the vote to avoid a runoff with all precincts reporting. The 67-year-old Reyes was first elected to Congress in 1996. Reyes received a rare primary endorsement last month from President Barack Obama.”

The power of outside groups: “O’Rourke’s bid was boosted by a Texas-based super PAC, the Campaign for Primary Accountability, which invested heavily in two House contests in the Lone Star State. In the other race where the PAC spent money, the 4th district GOP primary, 16-term Rep. Ralph Hall won easily,” Roll Call writes. “Reyes was not surprised. Acknowledging the tough primary, his campaign spent more than $460,000 and both sought and secured the endorsements of Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, who has had a decent record of backing winners in Democratic House primaries this cycle. Clinton campaigned for Reyes at a rally in El Paso last month.”

“With few House incumbents facing competitive primaries Tuesday in Texas, most of the action was in a handful of contests for safe open and new seats. As expected, almost all of those crowded races will be decided by July 31 runoffs after no candidate was able to get at least 50 percent of the primary vote,” Roll Call writes. “Democrats were unable to avoid a runoff in the one district that is expected to be competitive this fall. State Rep. Pete Gallego will face former Rep. Ciro Rodriguez in the Democratic runoff in the redrawn majority-Hispanic 23rd district. The winner will take on freshman Rep. Francisco “Quico” Canseco (R), who is a top target for Democrats.”

WISCONSIN: Political Wire: “Wisconsin election officials ‘are predicting that between 60 to 65 percent of the voting age population, or about 2.6 to 2.8 million people, will cast regular and absentee ballots in the June 5 recall election,’ the Wisconsin State Journal reports. ‘That level of turnout would be higher than the 49.7 percent of voters who turned out in the November 2010 gubernatorial general election, in which Gov. Scott Walker beat Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, his current challenger, by about five percentage points.’

FLORIDA: “A new Florida Opinion Research poll finds former Gov. Charlie Crist (I) would trounce Rick Scott (R) in Florida's 2014 gubernatorial race if Crist ran this time as a Democrat, 48% to 34%,” Political Wire writes.

ILLINOIS: “Brad Harriman, the Democratic nominee to replace retiring Rep. Jerry Costello (D-Ill.), has dropped out of the race, creating a major void and giving Republicans a better chance of winning the seat,” The Hill reports. “Harriman, who was Costello's hand-picked candidate and highly touted by national Democrats, cited a neurological disorder as his reason for quitting the campaign.”

NEVADA: Shelly Berkeley’s up with a new bio ad.

NORTH CAROLINA: The Democratic mess in the Tarheel state continues… “Adriadn Ortega, the young man who claimed that former state Democratic Party Executive Director Jay Parmley sexually harassed him, is threatening to sue the party and Chairman David Parker for defamation and breach of contract,” WRAL reports.”In a letter sent to Parker Tuesday, Ortega's lawyer, Kieran Shanahan, demands that the party save all documents that might be related to the episode.”

TEXAS: “Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and former state Solicitor General Ted Cruz are headed to a July 31 runoff to determine the Republican nominee for Senate, igniting a showdown between the Washington, D.C., tea party community and the Texas GOP establishment,” Roll Call writes, adding, “Cruz advancing to the runoff is a welcome development for Beltway-based conservatives who have been playing in GOP primaries with the hopes of recreating some of the tea party movement’s 2010 magic — especially after falling way short with their preferred candidate in the Nebraska Senate GOP primary earlier this month.”

“In a major upset, longtime U.S. Rep. Silvestre Reyes has lost the race for the Democratic nomination to retain his congressional seat in far West Texas,” AP writes. Reyes lost narrowly to former El Paso city councilman Beto O'Rourke. Reyes appeared to be closing the gap as more votes were tallied, but O'Rourke finished with just more than 50 percent of the vote to avoid a runoff with all precincts reporting. The 67-year-old Reyes was first elected to Congress in 1996. Reyes received a rare primary endorsement last month from President Barack Obama.”

The power of outside groups: “O’Rourke’s bid was boosted by a Texas-based super PAC, the Campaign for Primary Accountability, which invested heavily in two House contests in the Lone Star State. In the other race where the PAC spent money, the 4th district GOP primary, 16-term Rep. Ralph Hall won easily,” Roll Call writes. “Reyes was not surprised. Acknowledging the tough primary, his campaign spent more than $460,000 and both sought and secured the endorsements of Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, who has had a decent record of backing winners in Democratic House primaries this cycle. Clinton campaigned for Reyes at a rally in El Paso last month.”

“With few House incumbents facing competitive primaries Tuesday in Texas, most of the action was in a handful of contests for safe open and new seats. As expected, almost all of those crowded races will be decided by July 31 runoffs after no candidate was able to get at least 50 percent of the primary vote,” Roll Call writes. “Democrats were unable to avoid a runoff in the one district that is expected to be competitive this fall. State Rep. Pete Gallego will face former Rep. Ciro Rodriguez in the Democratic runoff in the redrawn majority-Hispanic 23rd district. The winner will take on freshman Rep. Francisco “Quico” Canseco (R), who is a top target for Democrats.”

WISCONSIN: Political Wire: “Wisconsin election officials ‘are predicting that between 60 to 65 percent of the voting age population, or about 2.6 to 2.8 million people, will cast regular and absentee ballots in the June 5 recall election,’ the Wisconsin State Journal reports. ‘That level of turnout would be higher than the 49.7 percent of voters who turned out in the November 2010 gubernatorial general election, in which Gov. Scott Walker beat Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, his current challenger, by about five percentage points.’