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Cain says he doesn't fear media, editorial boards

By NBC’s Ali Weinberg

JACKSONVILLE, FL -- Herman Cain isn’t scared of the media or editorial boards, he said Friday night.

He told reporters here that he sought the Secret Service not to shield himself from the media but because he sometimes felt "a little bit uncomfortable" on the campaign trail, including a New Hampshire situation on which he did not elaborate.

Cain asked for the security and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and congressional leaders approved his request Thursday, Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan confirmed to The Associated Press.

"No, it's not because you all are too scary," Cain said to reporters outside the Times-Union Performing Arts Center, where he had just given a speech.

Cain also said he was not afraid of editorial boards, even as the influential New Hampshire Union Leader board canceled a meeting with Cain after the campaign first said CSPAN could not film the meeting and then cut it down to 20 minutes.

Cain reiterated that the meeting was canceled due to a scheduling conflict and that he would do an hour-long interview with an editorial board in the future.
  
"Look, do you think I'd be running for president if I was scared of an editorial board or scared of the media or anybody? No! I'm not scared to go in front of the media," Cain said. 

Of Union-Leader publisher Joe McQuaid’s comments that he doesn’t think Cain is "going anywhere from here at this point, anyway," Cain said plenty of people shared McQuaid’s sentiment.

"The fact that he feels that way, welcome to the club. There are a lot of people out there who feel that way," Cain said.

One thing Cain definitely was not afraid to do was promote his 9-9-9 plan. After his press secretary J.D. Gordon, put an end to the gaggle and Cain began to walk away, he suddenly returned to the cameras and said, "One last thing, please: Jobs, jobs, jobs equals 9-9-9. You knew I had to get that in there, didn’t you?"

Herman Cain has become the first Republican primary candidate to receive Secret Service protection. NBC's Brian Williams reports.